Thomas Carroll

Personal Information
Title Associate Professor
Expertise Nephropathy
Institution University of Texas Southwestern
Data Summary
TypeCount
Grants/SubContracts 1
Progress Reports 1
Publications 1
Protocols 0
Committees 2

SubContract(s)


A screen for transcription factors that can promote transdifferentiation of stroma into epithelia
Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end stage renal disease in the United States. DN is characterized by fibrosis within the glomeruli and tubular interstitium. Although the precise causes of DN are not well understood, the ultimate effect is the loss of functional nephrons eventually leading to renal failure. Outside of organ transplant and dialysis, there are no treatments for this disease. Unfortunately, there is a gross shortage of kidneys available for transplant and dialysis has limited effectiveness and has a significant negative effect on quality of life. New therapies for renal replacement are needed. In this study, we propose performing a screen to identify transcription factors that are sufficient to re-program fibroblasts into nephron progenitors. The screen will initially be carried out by infecting stromal cell lines with pools of lenti-viruses expressing 18 transcription factors that are specifically expressed in the nephron progenitors and/or required for their development. By fractionating the pools, we will identify the minimum number of factors that gives the strongest response. Once we have identified an active set of factors, we will test their ability to transform stromal progenitors in cultured embryonic kidneys. Ultimately, we hope to test the efficacy of this active pool in mouse models of DN. Our ultimate goal is to identify factors that are sufficient to convert fibroblasts into functional nephrons in the context of the diseased kidney. This technology will serve to alleviate the gross shortage and/or inadequacy of current renal replacement therapies and could represent the earliest phase of a new type of therapy for chronic kidney disease.


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